WASHINGTON — The International Monetary Fund is slightly downgrading its outlook for the global recovery from the pandemic recession, reflecting the persistence of supply chain disruptions in industrialized countries and low vaccination rates in poor nations.

In its latest World Economic Outlook being released Tuesday, the IMF foresees global growth this year of 5.9%, compared with its projection in July of 6%.

"The global recovery continues but the momentum is hobbled by the pandemic," IMF Chief Economist Gita Gopinath told reporters at a briefing.

For the United Sates, the world's largest economy, the IMF predicts growth of 6% for 2021, below its July forecast of 7%. The downward revision reflects a slowdown in economic activity resulting from a rise in COVID-19 cases and delayed production caused by supply shortages and a resulting acceleration of inflation.

The IMF predicts that for the world's advanced economies as a whole, growth will amount to 5.2% this year, compared with a meager predicted gain of 3% for low-income developing countries.

"The dangerous divergence in economic prospects across countries," the IMF said, "remains a major concern."

The monetary fund expects the total output from advanced economies to recoup the losses they suffered during the pandemic by 2022 and to exceed their pre-pandemic growth path by 2024.

But in emerging and developing countries outside of China, the IMF warns, output will remain an estimated 5.5% below the output growth path that the IMF had been forecasting before the pandemic struck in March of last year. That downgrade poses a serious threat to living standards in those countries, the monetary fund said.

The IMF attributed that economic divergence to the sizable disparities in vaccine access between wealthy and low income countries. It said the outlook for poorer countries had "darkened considerably," reflecting the surge in cases of the delta variant that has elevated the COVID death toll worldwide to nearly 5 million.

While nearly 60% of the population in advanced economies are fully vaccinated, only about 4% of the population in the poorer countries are.

Gopinath said it should be a top priority to meet the goal of vaccinating at last 40% of the population in every country by the end of this year and 70% of the population in every country by the middle of next year.

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