Call 256-340-2433 if you want to review a listed book. Books must be picked up Monday-Wednesday.

• "The Second Sleep: A novel" — 1468. A young priest, Christopher Fairfax, arrives in a remote Exmoor village to conduct the funeral of his predecessor. The land around is strewn with ancient artefacts — coins, fragments of glass, human bones — which the old parson used to collect. Did his obsession with the past lead to his death? Fairfax becomes determined to discover the truth. Over the course of the next six days, everything he believes — about himself, his faith, and the history of his world — will be tested to destruction, by Robert Harris.

• "The Lives of Lucian Freud: The Restless Years, 1922-1968" — The first biography of the epic life of one of the most important, enigmatic and private artists of the 20th century. Drawn from almost 40 years of conversations with the artist, letters and papers, it is a major work written by a well-known British art critic, by William Feaver.

• "Think, Write, Speak: Uncollected Essays, Reviews, Interviews, and Letters to the Editor" — A rich compilation of the previously uncollected Russian and English prose and interviews of one of the twentieth century's greatest writers, edited by Nabokov experts Brian Boyd and Anastasia Tolstoy, by Vladimir Nabokov.

• "The Sorcerer's Apprentice: A Memoir of Picasso, Provence, and Douglas Cooper" — John Richardson's riveting memoir about growing up in England and, at 25, beginning his 12-year adventure with the controversial art collector Douglas Cooper.

• "Margaret Thatcher: Herself Alone: The Authorized Biography" — A masterful and definitive biography of Britain's first female prime minister reaches its climax with the story of her zenith and her fall, by Charles Moore.

• "The Captain and the Glory" — A savage satire of the United States in the throes of insanity, this blisteringly funny novel tells the story of a noble ship, the Glory, and the loud, clownish, and foul captain who steers it to the brink of disaster, by David Eggers.

• "The Mysterious Affair at Olivetti: IBM, the CIA, and the Cold War Conspiracy to Shut Down Production of the World's First Desktop Computer" — The never-before-told true account of the design and development of the first desktop computer by the world's most famous high-styled typewriter company, more than a decade before the arrival of the Osborne 1, the Apple 1, the first Intel microprocessor, and IBM's PC5150, Meryle Secrest.

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