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• "I hosted a moon party to celebrate the moonwalk. We kept waiting and waiting, and it kept getting later and later and later. I had several of my co-workers over, and we thought we were going to have to go to bed without seeing it because we had to go to work the next day. But, finally, it…

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Clicking through the images saved on his computer, Billy Warren Shelton paused as a black-and-white photograph of a woman and man shaking hands appeared on the screen.

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On the wall of David Stephenson’s Southwest Decatur home office, among the model of the Saturn V, the image of the lunar rover and the framed Silver Snoopy Award bestowed on him by Huntsville astronaut Jan Davis in 1990, hangs a colorful child’s drawing on construction paper of a shuttle roc…

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• “As a young man in my late 20s, I vividly recall watching the TV that Sunday night as Neil Armstrong slowly descended down the ladder of the lunar lander, stepped off the last rung and onto the surface of the moon. I thought it must be cool to be an astronaut, but realized that would never…

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The thin, yellow pamphlet that appeared at the small Pennsylvania college in 1959 touted the endless opportunities in north Alabama. The information about launching rockets and satellites intrigued Jon Haussler, a recent graduate of Susquehanna University with degrees in math, physics and ch…

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• "On Sunday night, July 20, 1969, First Baptist Church, Decatur, was having the homecoming concert of the youth choir returning from a mission trip. We were gathered in the fellowship hall, and television sets had been set up so we could watch the telecast of the first man to step on the mo…

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• “My husband and I got married July 20, 1969, at First Baptist Church in Decatur. We had a guest who came to the service, but hurried home so not to miss the first step on the moon. We were in an airplane on the way to Miami for our honeymoon when the pilot announced that Neil Armstrong had…

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In grainy footage recorded by a 12-pound camera and transmitted hundreds of thousands of miles across space, the world watched and listened as astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin transformed a world’s dream into reality, becoming the first men to step on the moon.